September is National Recovery Month

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September 12, 2015 | chris

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT…

The prevalence of mental and/or substance use disorders is high. Nearly one out of every five adults in the United States, about 43.8 million people, has a mental illness, such as a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder (excluding developmental and substance use disorders).1

Approximately 21.6 million people age 12 or older were classified with a substance dependence or misuse disorder in 2013.2

In spite of high prevalence, most Americans believe that recovery from a mental illness3 or a substance use disorder is possible.4

For many individuals, behavioral health treatment is an important part of the recovery process.5 However, in 2013, 22.7 million individuals aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem, but only 2.5 million received treatment at a specialty facility in the past year.6

High school and college students, families, and peer recovery networks all play unique roles in society and have the power to support healthy lifestyles. Members of the recovery community can lead the charge to educate these audiences about how they can provide support, starting with the basics.

FOR MANY PEOPLE, RECOVERY—

  • Emerges from hope, which is fostered by friends, families, providers, colleagues, and others who have experienced recovery themselves
  • Occurs via many pathways, which may include professional clinical treatment, use of medications, support from families and in schools, faith-based approaches, peer support, and other approaches
  • Is holistic, meaning recovery encompasses a person’s whole life including mind, body, spirit, and community
  • Is supported by relationships with peers and allies, and on social networks
  • Is culturally based and influenced
  • Is supported by addressing trauma, including physical or sexual abuse, domestic violence, war, disaster, or profound loss
  • Involves individual, family, and community strengths and responsibilities
  • Is fostered by respect These principles of recovery can help people establish a blueprint for their own journey. However, it’s also important for people living with these conditions to become aware that they are not alone in their efforts. The right support system can help ensure that those in need are addressing the following four key aspects of recovery.8
  • Health: The person learns to overcome or manage his or her condition(s) or symptom(s)—and make informed, healthy choices that support physical and emotional well-being.
  • Home: It is also important to have a stable and safe place to live.
  • Purpose: A person in recovery participates in meaningful daily activities, such as a job, school, volunteer opportunities, family care-taking, or creative endeavors, and has the independence, income, and resources to participate in society.
  • Community: Relationships and social networks should provide support, friendship, love, and hope. If you are currently in recovery, you have taken an important step that many have not yet achieved. If you are ready to take your journey away from addiction to pain pills or prescription medications, AppleGate Recovery can help.
FOOTNOTES: 1 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings, NSDUH Series H-49, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4887. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014, p. 1. 2 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-48, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4863. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014, p. 7. 3 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2006). National Mental Health Anti-Stigma Campaign: What a Difference a Friend Makes (SMA) 07-4257, p. 2. Retrieved January 14, 2015, from http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA07-4257/SMA07-4257.pdf. 4 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2008). Summary report CARAVAN® survey for SAMHSA on addictions and recovery. Rockville, MD: Office of Communications, SAMHSA. 5 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2012). SAMHSA's Working Definition of Recovery. Retrieved March 24, 2015, from http://store.samhsa.gov/product/SAMHSA-s-Working-Definition-of-Recovery/PEP12-RECDEF, p. 5. 6 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-48, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4863. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014, p. 7. 7 SAMHSA Blog. (2012). SAMHSA’s Working Definition of Recovery Updated. Retrieved January 14, 2015, from http://blog.samhsa.gov/2012/03/23/defintion-of-recovery-updated/. 8 SAMHSA Blog. (2012). SAMHSA’s Working Definition of Recovery Updated. Retrieved January 14, 2015, from http://blog.samhsa.gov/2012/03/23/defintion-of-recovery-updated/.